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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014, Article ID 436921, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/436921
Review Article

Microbiota in Healthy Skin and in Atopic Eczema

1National Health System Pediatrician ASL RMC-D6, Rome, Italy
2Italian Society of Pediatric Allergy and Immunology (SIAIP), Atopic Dermatitis and Urticaria Committee, Italy
3Pediatric Unit, Department of Clinical-Surgical, Diagnostic and Pediatric Sciences, University of Pavia, Pavia, Italy
4Department of Reproduction and Pediatrics, University Hospital S. Anna, Ferrara, Italy
5Pediatric Unit, Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy
6University of Trieste, Trieste, Italy
7Department of Woman, Child and General and Specialized Surgery, Second University of Naples, Naples, Italy
8Pediatric Allergy Unit, Research Center, San Pietro Hospital-Fatebenefratelli, Rome, Italy

Received 10 March 2014; Revised 9 June 2014; Accepted 17 June 2014; Published 13 July 2014

Academic Editor: Siddharth Pratap

Copyright © 2014 Giuseppe Baviera et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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