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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 439501, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/439501
Research Article

Early Trypanosoma cruzi Infection Reprograms Human Epithelial Cells

1Unidad de Biología Molecular, Montevideo 11400, Institut Pasteur de Montevideo, Uruguay
2Departamento de Bioquímica, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de la República, Montevideo 11300, Uruguay
3Sección Genética, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de la República, Montevideo 11400, Uruguay

Received 6 December 2013; Revised 27 February 2014; Accepted 27 February 2014; Published 9 April 2014

Academic Editor: Wanderley de Souza

Copyright © 2014 María Laura Chiribao et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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