Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
Retracted

BioMed Research International has retracted this article. The article was found to contain images with signs of duplication and manipulation in Figures 1(a), 1(b), 1(d), 2(b), 3(a), 3(b), 3(c), 3(d), 3(k), 4(d), 4(g), 4(m), 4(p), 8, 10(c), 10(d), 10(e), 10(f), 10(g), 10(h), 10(i), 10(j), 10(k), 10(l), and 10(o) and duplication from Talukdar D. An induced glutathione-deficient mutant in grass pea (Lathyrus sativus L.): Modifications in plant morphology, alteration in antioxidant activities and increased sensitivity to cadmium. Biorem. Biodiv Bioavail. 2012; 6: 75–86 in Figure 2B and from Dibyendu Talukdar and Tulika Talukdar, “Superoxide-Dismutase Deficient Mutants in Common Beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.): Genetic Control, Differential Expressions of Isozymes, and Sensitivity to Arsenic,” BioMed Research International, vol. 2013, Article ID 782450, 11 pages, 2013, doi: 10.1155/2013/782450 in Figure 10.

View the full Retraction here.

References

  1. D. Talukdar and T. Talukdar, “Leaf rolling and stem fasciation in grass pea (Lathyrus sativus l.) mutant are mediated through glutathione-dependent cellular and metabolic changes and associated with a metabolic diversion through cysteine during phenotypic reversal,” BioMed Research International, vol. 2014, Article ID 479180, 21 pages, 2014.
BioMed Research International
Volume 2014, Article ID 479180, 21 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/479180
Research Article

Leaf Rolling and Stem Fasciation in Grass Pea (Lathyrus sativus L.) Mutant Are Mediated through Glutathione-Dependent Cellular and Metabolic Changes and Associated with a Metabolic Diversion through Cysteine during Phenotypic Reversal

1Department of Botany, R.P.M College, University of Calcutta, Uttarpara, Hooghly, West Bengal 712 258, India
2Department of Botany, Acharya Prafulla Chandra Roy Government College, University of North Bengal, Darjeeling, West Bengal 734 010, India

Received 25 February 2014; Accepted 24 April 2014; Published 28 May 2014

Academic Editor: Pavel Hozak

Copyright © 2014 Dibyendu Talukdar and Tulika Talukdar. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Linked References

  1. S. Kopriva, S. G. Mugford, P. Baraniecka, B. R. Lee, C. A. Matthewman, and A. Koprivova, “Control of sulfur partitioning between primary and secondary metabolism in Arabidopsis,” Frontiers in Plant Science, vol. 3, pp. 1–9, 2012. View at Google Scholar
  2. C. H. Foyer and G. Noctor, “Ascorbate and glutathione: the heart of the redox hub,” Plant Physiology, vol. 155, no. 1, pp. 2–18, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  3. G. Noctor, A. Mhamdi, G. Queval, and C. H. Foyer, “Regulating the redox gatekeeper: vacuolar sequestration puts glutathione disulfide in its place,” Plant Physiology, vol. 163, pp. 665–671, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  4. M. -S. Rahantaniaina, A. Tuzet, A. Mhamdi, and G. Noctor, “Missing links in understanding redox signaling via thiol/disulfide modulation: how is glutathione oxidized in plants?” Frontiers in Plant Science, vol. 4, article 477, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  5. N. Traverso, R. Ricciarelli, M. Nitti et al., “Role of glutathione in cancer progression and chemoresistance,” Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity, vol. 2013, Article ID 972913, 10 pages, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  6. T. Vernoux, R. C. Wilson, K. A. Seeley et al., “The ROOT MERISTEMLESS1/CADMIUM SENSITIVE2 gene defines a glutathione-dependent pathway involved in initiation and maintenance of cell division during postembryonic root development,” Plant Cell, vol. 12, no. 1, pp. 97–109, 2000. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  7. J. Häsler, J. Wüest, T. Gaspar, and M. Crèvecoeur, “Long term in vitro-cultured plant cells show typical neoplastic features at the cytological level,” Biology of the Cell, vol. 95, no. 6, pp. 357–364, 2003. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  8. D. Talukdar, “Balanced hydrogen peroxide metabolism is central in controlling NaCl-induced oxidative stress in medicinal legume, fenugreek (Trigonella foenum-graecum L.),” Biochemistry & Molecular Biology, vol. 1, no. 2, pp. 34–43, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  9. S. J. Neill, R. Desikan, A. Clarke, R. D. Hurst, and J. T. Hancock, “Hydrogen peroxide and nitric oxide as signalling molecules in plants,” Journal of Experimental Botany, vol. 53, no. 372, pp. 1237–1247, 2002. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  10. D. Talukdar, “Arsenic-induced changes in growth and antioxidant metabolism of fenugreek,” Russian Journal of Plant Physiology, vol. 60, no. 5, pp. 652–660, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  11. D. Talukdar, “Exogenous calcium alleviates the impact of cadmium-induced oxidative stress in Lens culinaris Medic. seedlings through modulation of antioxidant enzyme activities,” Journal of Crop Science and Biotechnology, vol. 15, no. 4, pp. 325–334, 2013. View at Google Scholar
  12. D. P. Dixon and R. Edwards, “Selective binding of glutathione conjugates of fatty acid derivatives by plant glutathione transferases,” Journal of Biological Chemistry, vol. 284, no. 32, pp. 21249–21256, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  13. E. Laborde, “Glutathione transferases as mediators of signaling pathways involved in cell proliferation and cell death,” Cell Death and Differentiation, vol. 17, no. 9, pp. 1373–1380, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  14. H. Takahashi, S. Kopriva, M. Giordano, K. Saito, and R. Hell, “Sulfur assimilation in photosynthetic organisms: molecular functions and regulations of transporters and assimilatory enzymes,” Annual Review of Plant Biology, vol. 62, pp. 157–184, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  15. D. Talukdar and T. Talukdar, “Coordinated response of sulfate transport, cysteine biosynthesis and glutathione-mediated antioxidant defense in lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.) genotypes exposed to arsenic,” Protoplasma, 2014. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  16. S. Park and J. A. Imlay, “High levels of intracellular cysteine promote oxidative DNA damage by driving the Fenton reaction,” Journal of Bacteriology, vol. 185, no. 6, pp. 1942–1950, 2003. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  17. S. Krueger, A. Niehl, M. C. Lopez Martin et al., “Analysis of cytosolic and plastidic serine acetyltransferase mutants and subcellular metabolite distributions suggests interplay of the cellular compartments for cysteine biosynthesis in Arabidopsis,” Plant, Cell and Environment, vol. 32, no. 4, pp. 349–367, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  18. C. Álvarez, L. Calo, L. C. Romero, I. García, and C. Gotor, “An O-Acetylserine(thiol)lyase homolog with l-Cysteine desulfhydrase activity regulates cysteine homeostasis in arabidopsis,” Plant Physiology, vol. 152, no. 2, pp. 656–669, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  19. J. Chen, F.-H. Wu, W.-H. Wang et al., “Hydrogen sulphide enhances photosynthesis through promoting chloroplast biogenesis, photosynthetic enzyme expression, and thiol redox modification in Spinacia oleracea seedlings,” Journal of Experimental Botany, vol. 62, no. 13, pp. 4481–4493, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  20. J. A. Traverso, A. Pulido, M. I. Rodríguez-García, and J. D. Alché, “Thiol-based redox regulation in sexual plant reproduction: new insights and perspectives,” Frontiers in Plant Science, vol. 4, article 465, 2013. View at Google Scholar
  21. G. T. S. Beemster and T. I. Baskin, “Analysis of cell division and elongation underlying the developmental acceleration of root growth in Arabidopsis thaliana,” Plant Physiology, vol. 116, no. 4, pp. 1515–1526, 1998. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  22. L.-P. Zou, X.-H. Sun, Z.-G. Zhang et al., “Leaf rolling controlled by the homeodomain leucine zipper class IV gene roc5 in rice,” Plant Physiology, vol. 156, no. 3, pp. 1589–1602, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  23. L. Williams and J. C. Fletcher, “Stem cell regulation in the Arabidopsis shoot apical meristem,” Current Opinion in Plant Biology, vol. 8, no. 6, pp. 582–586, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  24. F. Taguchi-Shiobara, Z. Yuan, S. Hake, and D. Jackson, “The fasciated ear2 gene encodes a leucine-rich repeat receptor-like protein that regulates shoot meristem proliferation in maize,” Genes and Development, vol. 15, no. 20, pp. 2755–2766, 2001. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  25. N. Saruhan, R. Terzi, A. Saglam, and A. Kadioglu, “The relationship between leaf rolling and ascorbate-glutathione cycle enzymes in apoplastic and symplastic areas of Ctenanthe setosa subjected to drought stress,” Biological Research, vol. 42, no. 3, pp. 315–326, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  26. D. Talukdar, “Cytogenetic characterization of seven different primary tetrasomics in grass pea (Lathyrus sativus L.),” Caryologia, vol. 61, no. 4, pp. 402–410, 2008. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  27. M. C. Vaz Patto, B. Skiba, E. C. K. Pang, S. J. Ochatt, F. Lambein, and D. Rubiales, “Lathyrus improvement for resistance against biotic and abiotic stresses: from classical breeding to marker assisted selection,” Euphytica, vol. 147, no. 1-2, pp. 133–147, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  28. D. Talukdar, “Flavonoid-deficient mutants in grass pea (Lathyrus sativus L.): genetic control, linkage relationships, and mapping with aconitase and S nitrosoglutathione reductase isozyme loci,” The Scientific World Journal, vol. 2012, Article ID 345983, 11 pages, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  29. O. W. Griffith, “Glutathione and glutathione disulfide,” in Methods of Enzymatic Analysis, H. U. Bergmeyer, Ed., pp. 521–529, Verlagsgesellschaft, Weinheim, Germany, 1985. View at Google Scholar
  30. M. M. Bradford, “A rapid and sensitive method for the quantitation of microgram quantities of protein utilizing the principle of protein dye binding,” Analytical Biochemistry, vol. 72, no. 1-2, pp. 248–254, 1976. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  31. A. Blaszczyk, L. Sirko, M. J. Hawkesford, and A. Sirko, “Biochemical analysis of transgenic tobacco lines producing bacterial serine acetyltransferase,” Plant Science, vol. 162, no. 4, pp. 589–597, 2002. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  32. K. Saito, M. Kurosawa, K. Tatsuguchi, Y. Takagi, and I. Murakoshi, “Modulation of cysteine biosynthesis in chloroplasts of transgenic tobacco overexpressing cysteine synthase [O-acetylserine(thiol)-lyase],” Plant Physiology, vol. 106, no. 3, pp. 887–895, 1994. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  33. M. K. Gaitonde, “A spectrophotometric method for the direct determination of cysteine in the presence of other naturally occurring amino acids,” Biochemical Journal, vol. 104, no. 2, pp. 627–633, 1967. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  34. G. F. Seelig and A. Meister, “γ-Glutamylcysteine synthetase. Interactions of an essential sulfhydryl group,” Journal of Biological Chemistry, vol. 259, no. 6, pp. 3534–3538, 1984. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  35. E. Bloem, A. Riemenschneider, J. Volker et al., “Sulphur supply and infection with Pyrenopeziza brassicae influence L-cysteine desulphydrase activity in Brassica napus L,” Journal of Experimental Botany, vol. 55, no. 406, pp. 2305–2312, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  36. W. F. Beyer Jr. and I. Fridovich, “Assaying for superoxide dismutase activity: some large consequences of minor changes in conditions,” Analytical Biochemistry, vol. 161, no. 2, pp. 559–566, 1987. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  37. D. Talukdar and T. Talukdar, “Superoxide-dismutase deficient mutants in common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.): genetic control, differential expressions of isozymes, and sensitivity to arsenic,” BioMed Research International, vol. 2013, Article ID 782450, 11 pages, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  38. Y. Nakano and K. Asada, “Hydrogen peroxide is scavenged by ascorbate-specific peroxidase in spinach chloroplasts,” Plant and Cell Physiology, vol. 22, no. 5, pp. 867–880, 1981. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  39. I. Carlberg and B. Mannervik, “Glutathione reductase,” in Methods in Enzymology, M. Alton, Ed., pp. 484–490, Academic, San Diego, Calif, USA, 1985. View at Google Scholar
  40. L. Z.-S. Li Ze-Sheng, Z. R.-G. Zhen Rui-Guang, and P. A. Rea, “1-Chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzeene-elicited increase in vacuolar glutathione-S-conjugate transport activity,” Plant Physiology, vol. 109, no. 1, pp. 177–185, 1995. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  41. R. Edwards, “Characterization of glutathione transferases and glutathione peroxidases in pea (Pisum sativum),” Physiologia Plantarum, vol. 98, pp. 594–604, 1996. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  42. A. L. Baker and N. E. Tolbert, “Glycolate oxidase (ferredoxin-containing form),” Methods in Enzymology, vol. 9, pp. 338–342, 1966. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  43. J. Sekiya, A. Schmidt, L. G. Wilson, and P. Filner, “Emission of hydrogen sulfide by leaf tissue in response to L-cysteine,” Plant Physiology, vol. 70, pp. 430–436, 1982. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  44. C.-Q. Wang, M. Chen, and B.-S. Wang, “Betacyanin accumulation in the leaves of C3 halophyte Suaeda salsa L. is induced by watering roots with H2O2,” Plant Science, vol. 172, no. 1, pp. 1–7, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  45. D. Talukdar, “Arsenic-induced oxidative stress in the common bean legume, Phaseolus vulgaris L. seedlings and its amelioration by exogenous nitric oxide,” Physiology and Molecular Biology of Plants, vol. 19, no. 1, pp. 69–79, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  46. E. Aksoy, Effect of drought and salt stresses on the gene expression levels of antioxidant enzymes in lentil (Lens culinaris M.) seedlings [M.S. thesis], The Graduate School of Natural and Applied Sciences, Middle East Technical University, Ankara, Turkey, 2008.
  47. S. Han and D. Kim, “AtRTPrimer: database for Arabidopsis genome-wide homogeneous and specific RT-PCR primer-pairs,” BMC Bioinformatics, vol. 7, article 179, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  48. K. J. Livak and T. D. Schmittgen, “Analysis of relative gene expression data using real-time quantitative PCR and the 2-ΔΔCT method,” Methods, vol. 25, no. 4, pp. 402–408, 2001. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  49. D. Talukdar, “Fluorescent-banded karyotype analysis and identification of chromosomes in three improved Indian varieties of grass pea (Lathyrus sativus L.),” Chromosome Science, vol. 13, pp. 3–10, 2010. View at Google Scholar
  50. A. M. A. Matias and I. K. C. Fontanilla, “Optimizing the utility of Allium cepa L. var. aggregatum (sibuyas Tagalog) for the Allium Test by elucidating its mitotic periodicity and rhythmicity under varying light conditions,” Science Diliman, vol. 23, no. 1, pp. 43–51, 2011. View at Google Scholar
  51. D. Talukdar and A. K. Biswas, “Seven different primary trisomics in grass pea (Lathyrus sativus L.). I. Cytogenetic characterisation,” Cytologia, vol. 72, no. 4, pp. 385–396, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  52. G. E. Sarieva, S. S. Kenzhebaeva, and H. K. Lichtenthaler, “Adaptation potential of photosynthesis in wheat cultivars with a capability of leaf rolling under high temperature conditions,” Russian Journal of Plant Physiology, vol. 57, no. 1, pp. 28–36, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  53. R. Turgut and A. Kadioglu, “The effect of drought, temperature and irradiation on leaf rolling in Ctenanthe setosa,” Biologia Plantarum, vol. 41, no. 4, pp. 629–633, 1998. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  54. A. Kadioglu and R. Terzi, “A dehydration avoidance mechanism: leaf rolling,” Botanical Review, vol. 73, no. 4, pp. 290–302, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  55. A. Saglam, A. Kadioglu, R. Terzi, and N. Saruhan, “Physiological changes in them in post-stress emerging Ctenanthe setosa plants under drought conditions,” Russian Journal of Plant Physiology, vol. 55, no. 1, pp. 48–53, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  56. D. Talukdar, “Recent progress on genetic analysis of novel mutants and aneuploid research in grass pea (Lathyrus sativus L.),” African Journal of Agricultural Research, vol. 4, no. 13, pp. 1549–1559, 2009. View at Google Scholar
  57. V. N. Waghmare, D. N. Waghmare, and R. B. Mehra, “An induced fasciated mutant in grass pea (Lathyrus sativus L.),” Indian Journal of Genetics and Plant Breeding, vol. 61, pp. 155–157, 2001. View at Google Scholar
  58. S. Srinivasan, P. M. Gaur, and B. V. Rao, “Allelic relationship between spontaneous and induced mutant genes for stem fasciation in chickpea,” Plant Breeding, vol. 127, no. 3, pp. 319–321, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  59. E. Yamamoto, H. C. Karakaya, and H. T. Knap, “Molecular characterization of two soybean homologs of Arabidopsis thaliana CLAVATA1 from the wild type and fasciation mutant,” Biochimica et Biophysica Acta—Gene Structure and Expression, vol. 1491, no. 1–3, pp. 333–340, 2000. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  60. C. Toker, S. Shyam Yadav, and I. S. Solanki, “Lentil,” in Mutation Breeding, S. S. Yadav, D. L. McNeil, and P. C. Stevenson, Eds., pp. 209–224, Springer, Dordrecht, The Netherlands.
  61. M. R. Lucas, B. L. Huynh, V. P. da Silva et al., “Association studies and legume synteny reveal haplotypes determining seed size in Vigna unguiculata,” Frontiers in Plant Science, vol. 4, article 95, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  62. M. Niizeki and Z. Lu, “Somaclonal variation as a tool for plant breeding and genetics,” Bulletin of Faculty of Agriculture & Life Sciences, Hirosaki University, no. 6, pp. 1–17, 2003. View at Google Scholar
  63. E. M. Torres, N. Dephoure, A. Panneerselvam et al., “Identification of aneuploidy-tolerating mutations,” Cell, vol. 143, no. 1, pp. 71–83, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  64. J. M. Sheltzer, E. M. Torres, M. J. Dunhamc, and A. Amon, “Transcriptional consequences of aneuploidy,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, vol. 109, no. 31, pp. 12644–12649, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  65. B. Cetin and D. W. Cleveland, “How to survive aneuploidy,” Cell, vol. 143, no. 1, pp. 27–29, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  66. C.-W. Lee, M. Efetova, J. C. Engelmann et al., “Agrobacterium tumefaciens promotes tumor induction by modulating pathogen defense in arabidopsis thaliana,” Plant Cell, vol. 21, no. 9, pp. 2948–2962, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  67. D. D. Kuta and L. Tripathi, “Agrobacterium-induced hypersensitive necrotic reaction in plant cells: a resistance response against Agrobacterium-mediated DNA transfer,” African Journal of Biotechnology, vol. 4, no. 8, pp. 752–757, 2005. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  68. K. Komatsu, M. Hashimoto, J. Ozeki et al., “Viral-Induced systemic necrosis in plants involves both programmed cell death and the inhibition of viral multiplication, which are regulated by independent pathways,” Molecular Plant-Microbe Interactions, vol. 23, no. 3, pp. 283–293, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  69. P. D. Vivancos, Y. Dong, K. Ziegler et al., “Recruitment of glutathione into the nucleus during cell proliferation adjusts whole-cell redox homeostasis in Arabidopsis thaliana and lowers the oxidative defence shield,” The Plant Journal, vol. 64, no. 5, pp. 825–838, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  70. D. Talukdar, “Ascorbate deficient semi-dwarf asfL1 mutant of Lathyrus sativus exhibits alterations in antioxidant defense,” Biologia Plantarum, vol. 56, no. 4, pp. 675–682, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  71. P. Golstein and G. Kroemer, “Cell death by necrosis: towards a molecular definition,” Trends in Biochemical Sciences, vol. 32, no. 1, pp. 37–43, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  72. Y. Xie, C. Zhang, D. Lai et al., “Hydrogen sulfide delays GA-triggered programmed cell death in wheat aleurone layers by the modulation of glutathione homeostasis and heme oxygenase-1 expression,” Journal of Plant Physiology, vol. 171, no. 2, pp. 53–62, 2014. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar