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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 483140, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/483140
Research Article

Downtime after Critical Incidents in Emergency Medical Technicians/Paramedics

1Department of Pychiatry, Mt. Sinai Hospital and the University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada M5G 1X5
2Public Health Ontario and Departments of Family and Community Medicine and Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada M5G 1V2
3Sunnybrook Osler Centre for Prehospital Care, Toronto, Canada M4N 3M5
4Department of Psychology, Ryerson University, Toronto, Canada M5B 1X5

Received 26 January 2014; Accepted 10 April 2014; Published 4 May 2014

Academic Editor: Patrick Schober

Copyright © 2014 Janice Halpern et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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