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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014, Article ID 483657, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/483657
Review Article

The Interplay of Reovirus with Autophagy

1Institute of Molecular Biology, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung 402, Taiwan
2Department of Biology and Chemistry, Azusa Pacific University, Azusa, CA 91702, USA
3Graduate Institute of Microbiology and Public Health, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung 402, Taiwan
4Agricultural Biotechnology Center, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung 402, Taiwan
5Rong Hsing Research Center for Translational Medicine, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung 402, Taiwan

Received 6 January 2014; Accepted 6 February 2014; Published 10 March 2014

Academic Editor: Jiann-Ruey Hong

Copyright © 2014 Hung-Chuan Chiu et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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