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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 495764, 24 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/495764
Review Article

Human Genetic Disorders and Knockout Mice Deficient in Glycosaminoglycan

1Department of Pathobiochemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, Meijo University, 150 Yagotoyama, Tempaku-ku, Nagoya 468-8503, Japan
2Laboratory of Proteoglycan Signaling and Therapeutics, Frontier Research Center for Post-Genomic Science and Technology, Graduate School of Life Science, Hokkaido University, West-11, North-21, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido 001-0021, Japan

Received 9 May 2014; Accepted 8 June 2014; Published 13 July 2014

Academic Editor: George Tzanakakis

Copyright © 2014 Shuji Mizumoto et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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