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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014, Article ID 498410, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/498410
Research Article

Proteomic Identification of Altered Cerebral Proteins in the Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Animal Model

1Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam 463707, Republic of Korea
2School of Life Science, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju 500712, Republic of Korea
3Laboratory of Veterinary Anatomy, College of Veterinary Medicine, Konkuk University, Seoul 143701, Republic of Korea
4Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul 110744, Republic of Korea

Received 6 March 2014; Revised 14 August 2014; Accepted 25 August 2014; Published 16 September 2014

Academic Editor: Livio Luongo

Copyright © 2014 Francis Sahngun Nahm et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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