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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014, Article ID 504045, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/504045
Review Article

Antibodies in the Pathogenesis of Hypertension

1Vascular Biology & Immunopharmacology Group, Department of Pharmacology, Monash University, Clayton, VIC 3800, Australia
2Centre for Inflammatory Diseases, Department of Medicine, Southern Clinical School, Monash University, Clayton, VIC, Australia
3Vascular Biology & Atherosclerosis Laboratory, Baker IDI Heart and Diabetes Institute, Melbourne, VIC, Australia

Received 8 April 2014; Revised 21 May 2014; Accepted 4 June 2014; Published 23 June 2014

Academic Editor: Tomasz Guzik

Copyright © 2014 Christopher T. Chan et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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