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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 508725, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/508725
Research Article

Libidibia ferrea Mature Seeds Promote Antinociceptive Effect by Peripheral and Central Pathway: Possible Involvement of Opioid and Cholinergic Receptors

1Laboratório de Neuroquímica Molecular e Celular, Instituto de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade Federal do Pará (UFPA), Rua Augusto Correa s/n, Guamá, 66075-900 Belém, PA, Brazil
2Laboratório de Neuroinflamação, Instituto de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade Federal do Pará (UFPA), Rua Augusto Correa s/n, Guamá, 66075-900 Belém, PA, Brazil
3Laboratório de Biologia Celular e Tecidual, Centro de Biociências e Biotecnologia, Universidade Estadual do Norte Fluminense Darcy Ribeiro (UENF), Avenida Alberto Lamego 2000, Parque Califórnia, 28013-602 Campos dos Goytacazes, RJ, Brazil

Received 28 November 2013; Revised 4 February 2014; Accepted 2 March 2014; Published 22 April 2014

Academic Editor: Eiichi Kumamoto

Copyright © 2014 Luis Armando Sawada et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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