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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 516028, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/516028
Review Article

Towards Understanding the Roles of Heparan Sulfate Proteoglycans in Alzheimer’s Disease

1Beijing Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100010, China
2Department of Neuroscience, Pharmacology, University of Uppsala, The Biomedical Center, 751 23 Uppsala, Sweden
3Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology, University of Uppsala, The Biomedical Center, 751 23 Uppsala, Sweden

Received 3 May 2014; Accepted 12 July 2014; Published 23 July 2014

Academic Editor: Ilona Kovalszky

Copyright © 2014 Gan-lin Zhang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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