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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014, Article ID 540292, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/540292
Research Article

Fungi Treated with Small Chemicals Exhibit Increased Antimicrobial Activity against Facultative Bacterial and Yeast Pathogens

1Institute for Milk Hygiene, University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna, Veterinaerplatz 1, 1210 Vienna, Austria
2AIT-Austrian Institute of Technology GmbH, University and Research Campus Tulln, Konrad Lorenz Straße 24, 3430 Tulln on the Danube, Austria
3Fungal Genetics and Genomics Unit, Department of Applied Genetics and Cell Biology, BOKU University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences Vienna, Konrad Lorenz Straße 24, 3430 Tulln on the Danube, Austria

Received 7 March 2014; Revised 16 June 2014; Accepted 18 June 2014; Published 9 July 2014

Academic Editor: Isabel Sá-Correia

Copyright © 2014 Christoph Zutz et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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