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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014, Article ID 561426, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/561426
Review Article

Molecular Chaperones, Cochaperones, and Ubiquitination/Deubiquitination System: Involvement in the Production of High Quality Spermatozoa

1Dipartimento di Scienze Motorie e del Benessere, Università di Napoli Parthenope, Via Medina 40, 80133 Napoli, Italy
2Dipartimento di Medicina Sperimentale, Sezione “F. Bottazzi”, Seconda Università di Napoli, Via Costantinopoli 16, 80138 Napoli, Italy

Received 27 February 2014; Accepted 4 June 2014; Published 19 June 2014

Academic Editor: Rongjia Zhou

Copyright © 2014 Rosaria Meccariello et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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