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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014, Article ID 615854, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/615854
Review Article

Multisensory Integration and Internal Models for Sensing Gravity Effects in Primates

1Centre of Space Bio-Medicine, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Via Montpellier 1, 00133 Rome, Italy
2Department of Systems Medicine, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Via Montpellier 1, 00133 Rome, Italy
3Laboratory of Neuromotor Physiology, IRCCS Santa Lucia Foundation, Via Ardeatina 306, 00179 Rome, Italy

Received 2 May 2014; Accepted 26 May 2014; Published 1 July 2014

Academic Editor: Mariano Bizzarri

Copyright © 2014 Francesco Lacquaniti et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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