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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014, Article ID 639896, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/639896
Research Article

The c-MYC Protooncogene Expression in Cholesteatoma

1Department of Otorhinolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, B-A-Z County Hospital and University Hospital, Szentpéteri Kapu 72-76, Miskolc 3526, Hungary
2Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Research Center for Molecular Medicine, University of Debrecen, Medical and Health Science Center, Nagyerdei Körút 98, Debrecen 4032, Hungary
3Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Children’s Hospital Heim Pál, Üllői Ut 86, Budapest 1083, Hungary
4Department of Otorhinolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, Military Hospital, Podmaniczky Utca 109-111, Budapest 1062, Hungary
5Department of Human Genetics, University of Debrecen, Medical and Health Science Center, Nagyerdei Körút 98, Debrecen 4032, Hungary
6Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, University of Debrecen, Medical and Health Science Center, Nagyerdei Körút 98, Debrecen 4032, Hungary

Received 30 August 2013; Revised 13 December 2013; Accepted 21 December 2013; Published 10 February 2014

Academic Editor: Steffen Maune

Copyright © 2014 Enikő Palkó et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Cholesteatoma is an epidermoid cyst, which is most frequently found in the middle ear. The matrix of cholesteatoma is histologically similar to the matrix of the epidermoid cyst of the skin (atheroma); their epithelium is characterized by hyperproliferation. The c-MYC protooncogene located on chromosome 8q24 encodes a transcription factor involved in the regulation of cell proliferation and differentiation. Previous studies have found aneuploidy of chromosome 8, copy number variation of c-MYC gene, and the presence of elevated level c-MYC protein in cholesteatoma. In this study we have compared the expression of c-MYC gene in samples taken from the matrix of 26 acquired cholesteatomas (15 children and 11 adults), 15 epidermoid cysts of the skin (atheromas; head and neck region) and 5 normal skin samples (retroauricular region) using RT-qPCR, providing the first precise measurement of the expression of c-MYC gene in cholesteatoma. We have found significantly elevated c-MYC gene expression in cholesteatoma compared to atheroma and to normal skin samples. There was no significant difference, however, in c-MYC gene expression between cholesteatoma samples of children and adults. The significant difference in c-MYC gene expression level in cholesteatoma compared to that of atheroma implies a more prominent hyperproliferative phenotype which may explain the clinical behavior typical of cholesteatoma.