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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 640291, 22 pages
Review Article

Maternal Obesity and Occurrence of Fetal Macrosomia: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

1University of Ottawa, Faculty of Medicine, 451 Smyth Road, Ottawa, ON, Canada K1H 8M5
2Division of Maternal-Fetal Medicine, Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology & Newborn Care, The Ottawa Hospital, 501 Smyth Road, Ottawa, ON, Canada K1H 8L6
3Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, Ottawa, ON, Canada K1H 8L6
4Healthy Active Living and Obesity (HALO) Research Group, Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario, 401 Smyth Road, Ottawa, ON, Canada K1H 8L1

Received 25 August 2014; Accepted 9 November 2014; Published 7 December 2014

Academic Editor: Francesco Saverio Papadia

Copyright © 2014 Laura Gaudet et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.


Objective. To determine a precise estimate for the contribution of maternal obesity to macrosomia. Data Sources. The search strategy included database searches in 2011 of PubMed, Medline (In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations and Ovid Medline, 1950–2011), and EMBASE Classic + EMBASE. Appropriate search terms were used for each database. Reference lists of retrieved articles and review articles were cross-referenced. Methods of Study Selection. All studies that examined the relationship between maternal obesity (BMI ≥30 kg/m2) (pregravid or at 1st prenatal visit) and fetal macrosomia (birth weight ≥4000 g, ≥4500 g, or ≥90th percentile) were considered for inclusion. Tabulation, Integration, and Results. Data regarding the outcomes of interest and study quality were independently extracted by two reviewers. Results from the meta-analysis showed that maternal obesity is associated with fetal overgrowth, defined as birth weight ≥ 4000 g (OR 2.17, 95% CI 1.92, 2.45), birth weight ≥4500 g (OR 2.77,95% CI 2.22, 3.45), and birth weight ≥90% ile for gestational age (OR 2.42, 95% CI 2.16, 2.72). Conclusion. Maternal obesity appears to play a significant role in the development of fetal overgrowth. There is a critical need for effective personal and public health initiatives designed to decrease prepregnancy weight and optimize gestational weight gain.