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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014, Article ID 648389, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/648389
Research Article

Resistant Traits in Digital Organisms Do Not Revert Preselection Status despite Extended Deselection: Implications to Microbial Antibiotics Resistance

1School of Information Technology, Republic Polytechnic, Singapore 738964
2School of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 637459
3Department of Zoology, The University of Melbourne, VIC 3010, Australia

Received 28 February 2014; Revised 29 April 2014; Accepted 7 May 2014; Published 20 May 2014

Academic Editor: Sankar Subramanian

Copyright © 2014 Clarence F. G. Castillo and Maurice H. T. Ling. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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