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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014, Article ID 670842, 16 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/670842
Review Article

Molecular, Phenotypic Aspects and Therapeutic Horizons of Rare Genetic Bone Disorders

1Nova Southeastern University Health Sciences Division, Fort-Lauderdale-Davie, FL 33314, USA
2Florida International University (FIU), Miami, FL 33174, USA
3Department of Medicine, University of California San Diego (UCSD), 200 West Arbor Drive, MC 8485, San Diego, CA 92103, USA
4University of Pennsylvania School of Dental Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA
5Northeast Ohio Medical University (NEOMED) School of Medicine, Rootstown, OH 44272, USA

Received 28 February 2014; Revised 12 August 2014; Accepted 24 August 2014; Published 22 October 2014

Academic Editor: Vasiliki Galani

Copyright © 2014 Taha Faruqi et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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