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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014, Article ID 671041, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/671041
Review Article

Venomous and Poisonous Australian Animals of Veterinary Importance: A Rich Source of Novel Therapeutics

1Institute for Molecular Bioscience, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, QLD 4072, Australia
2School of Veterinary Science, The University of Queensland, Gatton, QLD 4343, Australia

Received 28 February 2014; Revised 23 May 2014; Accepted 3 June 2014; Published 21 July 2014

Academic Editor: Francesco Dondero

Copyright © 2014 Margaret C. Hardy et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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