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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014, Article ID 690796, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/690796
Review Article

Alternative Splicing Generates Different Parkin Protein Isoforms: Evidences in Human, Rat, and Mouse Brain

1Department of Bio-Medical Sciences, Section of Anatomy and Histology, University of Catania, Via S. Sofia, No. 87, 95123 Catania, Italy
2Functional Genomics Center, Institute of Neurological Sciences, Italian National Research Council, Via Paolo Gaifami, No. 18, 95125 Catania, Italy
3Department of Clinical and Molecular Biomedicine, Section of Pharmacology and Biochemistry, University of Catania, Viale Andrea Doria 6, 95125 Catania, Italy

Received 9 May 2014; Accepted 30 June 2014; Published 16 July 2014

Academic Editor: Suzanne Lesage

Copyright © 2014 Soraya Scuderi et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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