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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014, Article ID 691505, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/691505
Research Article

Reduced Amygdala Volume Is Associated with Deficits in Inhibitory Control: A Voxel- and Surface-Based Morphometric Analysis of Comorbid PTSD/Mild TBI

1Institute of Cognitive Science, University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, CO 80309, USA
2Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, CO 80309, USA
3VISN 19 Mental Illness Research Education and Clinical Center, Denver, CO 80220, USA
4University of Colorado Denver, Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, CO 80045, USA

Received 4 November 2013; Accepted 11 January 2014; Published 3 March 2014

Academic Editor: John A. Sweeney

Copyright © 2014 B. E. Depue et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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