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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014, Article ID 759791, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/759791
Research Article

Metabolic Effects of Hypoxia in Colorectal Cancer by 13C NMR Isotopomer Analysis

1Biophysics Unit, IBILI, Faculty of Medicine, University of Coimbra, 3000-548 Coimbra, Portugal
2Centre of Investigation on Environment, Genetics and Oncobiology (CIMAGO), Faculty of Medicine, University of Coimbra, 3001-301 Coimbra, Portugal
3Life Sciences Department, Faculty of Sciences and Technology, University of Coimbra, 3000-456 Coimbra, Portugal
4Faculty of Sciences and Technology, University of Coimbra, 3000-456 Coimbra, Portugal
5Radiotherapy Department, CHUC, 3000-075 Coimbra, Portugal
6Laboratory of Biochemical Genetics (CNC/UC), Faculty of Medicine, University of Coimbra, 3000-548 Coimbra, Portugal
7Center for Neuroscience and Cell Biology (CNC), 3004-517 Coimbra, Portugal

Received 28 February 2014; Accepted 27 May 2014; Published 1 July 2014

Academic Editor: Zhiqiang Meng

Copyright © 2014 Ana M. Abrantes et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

13C NMR isotopomer analysis was used to characterize intermediary metabolism in three colorectal cancer cell lines (WiDr, LS1034, and C2BBe1) and determine the “metabolic remodeling” that occurs under hypoxia. Under normoxia, the three colorectal cancer cell lines present high rates of lactate production and can be seen as “Warburg” like cancer cells independently of substrate availability, since such profile was dominant at both high and low glucose media contents. The LS1034 was the less glycolytic of the three cell lines and was the most affected by the event of hypoxia, raising abruptly glucose consumption and lactate production. The other two colorectal cell lines, WiDr and C2BBe1, adapted better to hypoxia and were able to maintain their oxidative fluxes even at the very low levels of oxygen. These differential metabolic behaviors of the three colorectal cell lines show how important an adequate knowledge of the “metabolic remodeling” that follows a given cancer treatment is towards the correct (re)design of therapeutic strategies against cancer.