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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014, Article ID 765207, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/765207
Review Article

Novel RNA Markers in Prostate Cancer: Functional Considerations and Clinical Translation

Working Group Cancer Genome Research, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) and German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), National Center for Tumor Diseases (NCT), Im Neuenheimer Feld 460, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany

Received 7 March 2014; Revised 1 August 2014; Accepted 5 August 2014; Published 28 August 2014

Academic Editor: Andreas Doll

Copyright © 2014 Julia M. A. Pickl et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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