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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 765715, 8 pages
Research Article

Complex Links between Natural Tuberculosis and Porcine Circovirus Type 2 Infection in Wild Boar

1Departamento de Sanidad Animal, Facultad de Veterinaria, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, 28040 Madrid, Spain
2SaBio-IREC (CSIC-UCLM-JCCM), Ronda de Toledo s/n, 13005 Ciudad Real, Spain
3Centre de Recerca en Sanitat Animal (CReSA), UAB-IRTA, Campus de la Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra, Spain
4Instituto Vasco de Investigación y Desarrollo Agrario (NEIKER), Departamento de Sanidad Animal, Berreaga 1, Derio, 48160 Vizcaya, Spain
5Departament de Sanitat i d’Anatomia Animals, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra, Spain

Received 8 October 2013; Revised 14 May 2014; Accepted 16 May 2014; Published 3 June 2014

Academic Editor: Julio Alvarez

Copyright © 2014 Iratxe Díez-Delgado et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.


Individuals in natural populations are exposed to a diversity of pathogens which results in coinfections. The aim of this study was to investigate the relation between natural infection with tuberculosis (TB) due to infection by bacteria of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex and porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) in free-ranging Eurasian wild boar (Sus scrofa). Apparent prevalence for TB lesions and PCV2 infection was extremely high in all age classes, including piglets (51% for TB; 85.7% for PCV2). Modeling results revealed that the relative risk of young (less than 2 years old) wild boar to test positive to PCV2 PCR was negatively associated with TB lesion presence. Also, an interaction between TB, PCV2, and body condition was evidenced: in wild boar with TB lesions probability of being PCV2 PCR positive increased with body condition, whereas this relation was negative for wild boar without TB lesions. This study provides insight into the coinfections occurring in free-ranging host populations that are naturally exposed to several pathogens at an early age. Using TB and PCV2 as a case study, we showed that coinfection is a frequent event among natural populations that takes place early in life with complex effects on the infections and the hosts.