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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014, Article ID 768758, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/768758
Review Article

CXC and CC Chemokines as Angiogenic Modulators in Nonhaematological Tumors

1Clinica di Oncologia Medica, AOU “Ospedali Riuniti ,” Università Politecnica delle Marche, Via Conca, 60020 Ancona, Italy
2UOC Medical Oncology, Department of Oncology, AUSL8, 52100 Arezzo, Italy
3School of Pharmacy, Section of Experimental Medicine, University of Camerino, 62032 Camerino, Italy
4Medical Oncology, Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria Integrata, University of Verona, Piazzale L.A. Scuro 10, 37124 Verona, Italy
5Dipartimento di Scienze Cliniche Specialistiche ed Odontostomatologiche, Clinica di Urologia, AOU Ospedali Riuniti, Università Politecnica delle Marche, Via Conca 71, 60126 Ancona, Italy

Received 29 January 2014; Accepted 8 April 2014; Published 29 May 2014

Academic Editor: Yi-Fang Ping

Copyright © 2014 Matteo Santoni et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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