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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014, Article ID 769452, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/769452
Research Article

Gender-Dependent Effect of GSTM1 Genotype on Childhood Asthma Associated with Prenatal Tobacco Smoke Exposure

1Department of Pediatrics, Show Chwan Memorial Hospital, 542 Section 1, Zhongshan Road, Changhua 50008, Taiwan
2Department of Medical Research, Show Chwan Medical System in Chang Bing, 6 Lu-Kung Road, Changhua 50544, Taiwan
3Institute of Clinical Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, 155 Section 2, Linong Street, Taipei 11221, Taiwan
4Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taiwan and Chang Gung University College of Medicine, 123 Dapi Road, Kaohsiung 83301, Taiwan
5Genomic and Proteomic Core Laboratory, Department of Medical Research, Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University College of Medicine, 123 Dapi Road, Kaohsiung 83301, Taiwan
6Department of Pediatrics, Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University College of Medicine, 123 Dapi Road, Kaohsiung 83301, Taiwan
7Department of Pediatrics, Po-Jen Hospital, 350 Bo’ai 2nd Road, Kaohsiung 81358, Taiwan

Received 5 June 2014; Accepted 19 August 2014; Published 18 September 2014

Academic Editor: Carla M. Calò

Copyright © 2014 Chih-Chiang Wu et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

It remains unclear whether the GSTM1 genotype interacts with tobacco smoke exposure (TSE) in asthma development. This study aimed to investigate the interactions among GSTM1 genotype, gender, and prenatal TSE with regard to childhood asthma development. In a longitudinal birth cohort in Taiwan, 756 newborns completed a 6-year follow-up, and 591 children with DNA samples available for GSTM1 genotyping were included in the study, and the interactive influences of gender-GSTM1 genotyping-prenatal TSE on childhood asthma development were analyzed. Among these 591 children, 138 (23.4%) had physician-diagnosed asthma at 6 years of age, and 347 (58.7%) were null-GSTM1. Prenatal TSE significantly increased the prevalence of childhood asthma in null-GSTM1 children relative to those with positive GSTM1. Further analysis showed that prenatal TSE significantly increased the risk of childhood asthma in girls with null-GSTM1. Furthermore, among the children without prenatal TSE, girls with null-GSTM1 had a significantly lower risk of developing childhood asthma and a lower total IgE level at 6 years of age than those with positive GSTM1. This study demonstrates that the GSTM1 null genotype presents a protective effect against asthma development in girls, but the risk of asthma development increases significantly under prenatal TSE.