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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014, Article ID 782709, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/782709
Research Article

Glucagon Effects on 3H-Histamine Uptake by the Isolated Guinea-Pig Heart during Anaphylaxis

1Faculty of Medical Sciences, Department of Physiology, University of Kragujevac, 69 Svetozara Markovica Street, 34 000 Kragujevac, Serbia
2Research Center of Serbian Academy of Arts and Sciences and the University of Kragujevac, Kragujevac, Serbia
3Clinical Physiology Institute, National Council of Research, Viale G. Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa, Italy

Received 13 January 2014; Revised 3 March 2014; Accepted 3 March 2014; Published 11 May 2014

Academic Editor: Kazim Husain

Copyright © 2014 Mirko Rosic et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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