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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014, Article ID 784706, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/784706
Review Article

Dynamic Alu Methylation during Normal Development, Aging, and Tumorigenesis

1Beijing Institute of Genomics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101, China
2Epigenomics and Computational Biology Lab, Virginia Bioinformatics Institute, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24060, USA
3Department of Biological Sciences, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24060, USA

Received 10 April 2014; Accepted 16 August 2014; Published 27 August 2014

Academic Editor: Yeon-Su Lee

Copyright © 2014 Yanting Luo et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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