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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014, Article ID 817613, 15 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/817613
Research Article

Accumulation of Extracellular Hyaluronan by Hyaluronan Synthase 3 Promotes Tumor Growth and Modulates the Pancreatic Cancer Microenvironment

1Halozyme Therapeutics, Inc., 11388 Sorrento Valley Road, San Diego, CA 92121, USA
2Sarah Cannon Research Institute/Tennessee Oncology, PLLC, 250 25th Avenue North, Nashville, TN 37203, USA
3Labfinity, 8110 Cordova Road, Suite 119, Cordova, TN 38016, USA
4Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, 1 Bungtown Road, Cold Spring Harbor, NY 11724, USA
5Intrexon Corporation, 6620 Mesa Ridge Road, San Diego, CA 92121, USA

Received 25 April 2014; Accepted 27 June 2014; Published 24 July 2014

Academic Editor: Paraskevi Heldin

Copyright © 2014 Anne Kultti et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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