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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014, Article ID 832573, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/832573
Research Article

Clusters of Adolescent and Young Adult Thyroid Cancer in Florida Counties

1Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of West Florida, Pensacola, FL 32514, USA
2Florida State University College of Medicine, P.O. Box 33655, Pensacola, FL 32508, USA

Received 7 February 2014; Accepted 10 April 2014; Published 28 April 2014

Academic Editor: Handan Wand

Copyright © 2014 Raid Amin and James J. Burns. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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