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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 839019, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/839019
Research Article

High-Level Antimicrobial Efficacy of Representative Mediterranean Natural Plant Extracts against Oral Microorganisms

1Department of Operative Dentistry and Periodontology, Center for Dental Medicine, University of Freiburg, Hugstetter Straße 55, 79106 Freiburg, Germany
2Department of Pharmacognosy and Natural Product Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, 15771 Athens, Greece
3Department of Hygiene and Microbiology, Albert-Ludwigs University, 79104 Freiburg, Germany

Received 24 April 2014; Revised 6 June 2014; Accepted 7 June 2014; Published 26 June 2014

Academic Editor: Nikos Chorianopoulos

Copyright © 2014 Lamprini Karygianni et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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