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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014, Article ID 851349, 19 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/851349
Research Article

Atg6/UVRAG/Vps34-Containing Lipid Kinase Complex Is Required for Receptor Downregulation through Endolysosomal Degradation and Epithelial Polarity during Drosophila Wing Development

Department of Anatomy, Cell and Developmental Biology, Eotvos Lorand University, Budapest 1117, Hungary

Received 24 January 2014; Accepted 1 April 2014; Published 21 May 2014

Academic Editor: Gábor Juhász

Copyright © 2014 Péter Lőrincz et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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