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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014, Article ID 860651, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/860651
Review Article

Adipokines, Biomarkers of Endothelial Activation, and Metabolic Syndrome in Patients with Ankylosing Spondylitis

1Epidemiology, Genetics and Atherosclerosis Research Group on Systemic Inflammatory Diseases, Rheumatology Division, IDIVAL, 39011 Santander, Spain
2Rheumatology Division, Hospital Lucus Augusti, 27003 Lugo, Spain
3Oncology Division, Hospital del Bierzo, 24411 Ponferrada, León, Spain
4Cardiology Division, Hospital Lucus Augusti, 27003 Lugo, Spain
5Computational Biology, School of Medicine, University of Cantabria, IDIVAL, and CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), 39011 Santander, Spain

Received 7 January 2014; Accepted 13 February 2014; Published 18 March 2014

Academic Editor: Lorenzo Cavagna

Copyright © 2014 Fernanda Genre et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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