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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014, Article ID 867069, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/867069
Review Article

Biomarkers of Mercury Exposure in the Amazon

Evandro Chagas Institute (IEC), Health Surveillance Secretariat (SVS), 660990 Belém do Pará, PA, Brazil

Received 20 October 2013; Accepted 8 April 2014; Published 27 April 2014

Academic Editor: Michael Mahler

Copyright © 2014 Nathália Santos Serrão de Castro and Marcelo de Oliveira Lima. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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