Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
BioMed Research International
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 867235, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/867235
Research Article

The Domain Landscape of Virus-Host Interactomes

1Institute Pasteur of Shanghai, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 320 Yueyang Road, Shanghai 200031, China
2Hubei Bioinformatics and Molecular Imaging Key Laboratory, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 1037 Luoyu Road, Wuhan 430074, China
3Shanghai Center for Bioinformation Technology, 1278 Keyuan Road, Shanghai 201203, China
4Key Laboratory of Systems Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 320 Yueyang Road, Shanghai 200031, China

Received 4 February 2014; Accepted 19 March 2014; Published 4 June 2014

Academic Editor: Yudong Cai

Copyright © 2014 Lu-Lu Zheng et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Viral infections result in millions of deaths in the world today. A thorough analysis of virus-host interactomes may reveal insights into viral infection and pathogenic strategies. In this study, we presented a landscape of virus-host interactomes based on protein domain interaction. Compared to the analysis at protein level, this domain-domain interactome provided a unique abstraction of protein-protein interactome. Through comparisons among DNA, RNA, and retrotranscribing viruses, we identified a core of human domains, that viruses used to hijack the cellular machinery and evade the immune system, which might be promising antiviral drug targets. We showed that viruses preferentially interacted with host hub and bottleneck domains, and the degree and betweenness centrality among three categories of viruses are significantly different. Further analysis at functional level highlighted that different viruses perturbed the host cellular molecular network by common and unique strategies. Most importantly, we creatively proposed a viral disease network among viral domains, human domains and the corresponding diseases, which uncovered several unknown virus-disease relationships that needed further verification. Overall, it is expected that the findings will help to deeply understand the viral infection and contribute to the development of antiviral therapy.