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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 893468, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/893468
Clinical Study

Improvement in Hemodynamic Responses to Metaboreflex Activation after One Year of Training in Spinal Cord Injured Humans

1Sports Physiology Laboratory, Department of Medical Sciences, University of Cagliari, Via Porcell 4, 09124 Cagliari, Italy
2Unit of Cardiology and Angiology, Department of Medical Sciences, AOU University of Cagliari, 09042 Monserrato, Italy

Received 7 October 2013; Accepted 26 February 2014; Published 7 April 2014

Academic Editor: Massimo F. Piepoli

Copyright © 2014 Raffaele Milia et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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