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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 923805, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/923805
Review Article

Recent Insights in the Paracrine Modulation of Cardiomyocyte Contractility by Cardiac Endothelial Cells

Inserm UMR 1063 (Stress Oxydant et Pathologies Métaboliques (SOPAM)), Institut de Biologie en Santé-IRIS, 4 rue Larrey CHU, 49933 Angers Cedex 9, France

Received 13 December 2013; Revised 13 February 2014; Accepted 14 February 2014; Published 13 March 2014

Academic Editor: Iveta Bernatova

Copyright © 2014 Jacques Noireaud and Ramaroson Andriantsitohaina. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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