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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014, Article ID 932757, 20 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/932757
Review Article

Rodent Models of Depression: Neurotrophic and Neuroinflammatory Biomarkers

1Laboratory of Functional Biochemistry of Nervous System and Laboratory of Conditioned Reflex and Emotion, Institute of Higher Nervous Activity and Neurophysiology, RAS, 5a Butlerov Street, Moscow 117485, Russia
2Laboratory of Functional Neurogenomics, Institute of Cytology and Genetics, Russian Academy of Sciences, 10 Academician Lavrentyev Avenue, Novosibirsk 630090, Russia
3Department of Physiology, Novosibirsk State University, 2 Pirogov Street, Novosibirsk 630090, Russia

Received 11 February 2014; Accepted 18 May 2014; Published 5 June 2014

Academic Editor: Corina O. Bondi

Copyright © 2014 Mikhail Stepanichev et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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