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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014, Article ID 946075, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/946075
Review Article

Homeobox Genes and Melatonin Synthesis: Regulatory Roles of the Cone-Rod Homeobox Transcription Factor in the Rodent Pineal Gland

Department of Neuroscience and Pharmacology, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Rigshospitalet 6102, Blegdamsvej 9, 2100 Copenhagen, Denmark

Received 26 January 2014; Accepted 7 April 2014; Published 30 April 2014

Academic Editor: Yoav Gothilf

Copyright © 2014 Kristian Rohde et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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