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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014, Article ID 956579, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/956579
Research Article

Effects of Dental Methacrylates on Oxygen Consumption and Redox Status of Human Pulp Cells

1Istituto di Biochimica e Biochimica Clinica, Facoltà di Medicina e Chirurgia, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Largo Francesco Vito 1, 00168 Rome, Italy
2Laboratorio di Patologia Clinica, Ospedale M.G. Vannini, Via dell’Acqua Bullicante, 00177 Rome, Italy
3Department of Neurosciences, Reproductive and Odontostomatological Sciences, University of Naples “Federico II”, Via G. Pansini 5, 80131 Napoli, Italy
4Istituto di Chimica del Riconoscimento Molecolare, C.N.R., c/o Largo Francesco Vito 1, 00168 Rome, Italy
5Istituto di Clinica Odontoiatrica, Facoltà di Medicina e Chirurgia, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Largo Francesco Vito 1, 00168 Rome, Italy

Received 24 April 2013; Revised 13 November 2013; Accepted 22 November 2013; Published 12 February 2014

Academic Editor: Chiu-Chung Young

Copyright © 2014 Giuseppina Nocca et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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