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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014, Article ID 958209, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/958209
Research Article

Antidepressant-Like Effect of Ilex paraguariensis in Rats

1Programa de Pós-Graduação em Farmacologia, 97105-900 Santa Maria, RS, Brazil
2Curso de Farmácia, Universidade de Cruz Alta, 98020-290 Cruz Alta, RS, Brazil
3Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciências Biológicas/Bioquímica Toxicológica, 97105-900 Santa Maria, RS, Brazil
4Curso de Farmácia, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, 97105-900 Santa Maria, RS, Brazil
5Departamento de Farmácia Industrial, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, 97105-900 Santa Maria, RS, Brazil

Received 4 November 2013; Revised 31 January 2014; Accepted 25 March 2014; Published 4 May 2014

Academic Editor: Adair Santos

Copyright © 2014 Elizete De Moraes Reis et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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