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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014, Article ID 970540, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/970540
Research Article

Naja naja karachiensis Envenomation: Biochemical Parameters for Cardiac, Liver, and Renal Damage along with Their Neutralization by Medicinal Plants

1Department of Pharmacy, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Abbottabad 22060, Pakistan
2Multan Institute of Nuclear Medicine and Radiotherapy (MINAR), 377, Nishtar Hospital, Multan 60000, Pakistan
3Institute of Biochemistry, University of Balochistan, Quetta 87300, Pakistan
4Department of Environmental Sciences, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Abbottabad 22060, Pakistan
5Roba-al-Safwa Pharmacy, Alsafwa Hospital 67, Makkah, Saudi Arabia
6University College of Pharmacy, University of the Punjab, Lahore 54000, Pakistan

Received 17 January 2014; Accepted 27 March 2014; Published 27 April 2014

Academic Editor: Andrei Surguchov

Copyright © 2014 Muhammad Hassham Hassan Bin Asad et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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