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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 102129, 11 pages
Review Article

Biologically Active and Antimicrobial Peptides from Plants

1Departamento de Bioquímica, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, 31270-901 Belo Horizonte, Brazil
2Unidad Profesional Interdisciplinaria de Biotecnología, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Avenida Acueducto S/N, Colonia Barrio La Laguna Ticomán, 07320 Mexico City, Mexico

Received 15 August 2014; Revised 13 October 2014; Accepted 31 October 2014

Academic Editor: Dennis K. Bideshi

Copyright © 2015 Carlos E. Salas et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.


Bioactive peptides are part of an innate response elicited by most living forms. In plants, they are produced ubiquitously in roots, seeds, flowers, stems, and leaves, highlighting their physiological importance. While most of the bioactive peptides produced in plants possess microbicide properties, there is evidence that they are also involved in cellular signaling. Structurally, there is an overall similarity when comparing them with those derived from animal or insect sources. The biological action of bioactive peptides initiates with the binding to the target membrane followed in most cases by membrane permeabilization and rupture. Here we present an overview of what is currently known about bioactive peptides from plants, focusing on their antimicrobial activity and their role in the plant signaling network and offering perspectives on their potential application.