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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015, Article ID 121575, 19 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/121575
Research Article

Gene Signature of Human Oral Mucosa Fibroblasts: Comparison with Dermal Fibroblasts and Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

Department of Molecular Biology, Institute of Health Biosciences, The University of Tokushima Graduate School, 3-18-15 Kuramoto-cho, Tokushima 770-8504, Japan

Received 21 January 2015; Revised 3 April 2015; Accepted 10 April 2015

Academic Editor: Feng Luo

Copyright © 2015 Keiko Miyoshi et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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