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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015, Article ID 128697, 15 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/128697
Review Article

Health Safety of Soft Drinks: Contents, Containers, and Microorganisms

Institute of Fermentation Technology and Microbiology, Faculty of Biotechnology and Food Sciences, Lodz University of Technology, Wolczanska 171/173, 90-924 Lodz, Poland

Received 10 September 2014; Revised 12 November 2014; Accepted 4 December 2014

Academic Editor: Stanley Brul

Copyright © 2015 Dorota Kregiel. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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