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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015, Article ID 161648, 15 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/161648
Review Article

Cracking the Code of Human Diseases Using Next-Generation Sequencing: Applications, Challenges, and Perspectives

1CEINGE-Biotecnologie Avanzate, Via G Salvatore 486, 80145 Naples, Italy
2Department of Molecular Medicine and Medical Biotechnologies, University of Naples Federico II, Ed. 19, Via Sergio Pansini 5, 80131 Naples, Italy
3IRCCS-Fondazione SDN, 80143 Naples, Italy

Received 6 June 2015; Revised 30 September 2015; Accepted 18 October 2015

Academic Editor: Paul Baird

Copyright © 2015 Vincenza Precone et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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