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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 165074, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/165074
Research Article

Social Cognitive Mediators of Sociodemographic Differences in Colorectal Cancer Screening Uptake

Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Health Behaviour Research Centre, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT, UK

Received 6 March 2015; Revised 8 May 2015; Accepted 17 May 2015

Academic Editor: Amy McQueen

Copyright © 2015 Siu Hing Lo et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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