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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015, Article ID 169381, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/169381
Research Article

Bioaccessible Antioxidants in Milk Fermented by Bifidobacterium longum subsp. longum Strains

Institut sur la Nutrition et les Aliments Fonctionnels (INAF), Université Laval, 2440 Boulevard Hochelaga, Québec, QC, Canada G1V 0A6

Received 19 June 2014; Accepted 25 September 2014

Academic Editor: Riitta Korpela

Copyright © 2015 Mérilie Gagnon et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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