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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 169841, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/169841
Research Article

Adventitial Alterations Are the Main Features in Pulmonary Artery Remodeling due to Long-Term Chronic Intermittent Hypobaric Hypoxia in Rats

1Institute of Health Studies, Universidad Arturo Prat, Avenue Arturo Prat 2120, 11100939 Iquique, Chile
2Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, c/Arzobispo Morcillo 2, 28029 Madrid, Spain
3Department of Biological and Physiological Sciences, Faculty of Sciences and Philosophy/IIA, Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia, Avenue Honorario Delgado 430, Urb. Ingenieria, Distrito, Lima 31, Peru
4Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, c/Arzobispo Morcillo 2, 28029 Madrid, Spain

Received 3 August 2014; Revised 21 October 2014; Accepted 5 November 2014

Academic Editor: Shiro Mizuno

Copyright © 2015 Julio Brito et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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