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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015, Article ID 198612, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/198612
Review Article

An Overview of Potential Targets for Treating Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and Huntington’s Disease

Laboratório de Neurofarmacologia, Departamento de Farmacologia, Instituto de Ciências Biológicas (ICB), Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Campus Pampulha, 31270901 Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil

Received 5 December 2014; Accepted 8 April 2015

Academic Editor: Eduardo Candelario-Jalil

Copyright © 2015 Caroline Zocatelli de Paula et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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