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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 208947, 19 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/208947
Review Article

Can Exposure to Environmental Chemicals Increase the Risk of Diabetes Type 1 Development?

1Department of Food, Water and Cosmetics, Division of Environmental Medicine, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, P.O. Box 4404, Nydalen, 0403 Oslo, Norway
2Department of Chronic Diseases, Division of Epidemiology, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, P.O. Box 4404, Nydalen, 0403 Oslo, Norway

Received 28 June 2014; Accepted 14 September 2014

Academic Editor: Jill M. Norris

Copyright © 2015 Johanna Bodin et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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